March 13, 2013

Calif. agency adds triple bike racks

Oxnard, Calif.-based Gold Coast Transit (GCT) is installing a triple-bike rack on their full fleet of 54 buses.

Until recently, only two-bicycle racks had measurements that met state vehicle code, which limits 40-foot buses to bike racks that extend at most 36 inches from the front of the vehicle when fully deployed, and handlebars that do not extend more than 42 inches from the bus.

Last year, Sportworks developed a triple-bike rack that complies with codes. In turn, the Ventura County Transportation Commission (VCTC) authorized the purchase of as many as 100 Sportsworks “slim” triple-bike racks to be installed on VISTA intercity buses as well as on GCT, Moorpark Transit, Simi Valley Transit and Thousand Oaks Transit.

Additionally, Gov. Jerry Brown signed Assembly Bill 2488 last fall, which extends the allowable length of folding bicycle racks by four inches, giving GCT yet another option to accommodate this third bike rack.

“We are thrilled to have the ability to now accommodate the highly anticipated third bike rack. We are making every effort to ensure the successful installation of these racks and offer them to our passengers as quickly as possible,” said GCT GM Steven P. Brown.

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