Rail

Trapeze asset mgmt. system aboard new Portland streetcar

Posted on September 21, 2012

Trapeze Group announced that the new streetcars and track infrastructure deployed in Portland, Ore., as part of the Central Loop Project, are being supported and managed by Trapeze Enterprise Asset Management (EAM) technology. When the project celebrates its grand opening with free rides to all passengers this weekend, Trapeze EAM solutions for rolling stock, linear assets and facilities are going to be working for Portland Streetcar as well.

The Trapeze solution that Portland Streetcar purchased is a fully integrated system managing rolling stock throughout its life cycle, from pre-acquisition to post-disposition. With robust and comprehensive functionality, Trapeze EAM ensures equipment reliability, regulatory compliance and cost containment. The system also helps Portland Streetcar manage the right-of-way including inspections, defect recording and repair of rail track, signals, switches, catenary and electric traction.

Additionally, Trapeze EAM tracks all functions related to the maintenance of transit infrastructure, including stops and stations, offices, maintenance facilities, revenue equipment, communications gear, stationary equipment and IT assets. There can be thousands of large and small assets to oversee and maintain, and Trapeze EAM is a critical tool for managing this infrastructure and stationary assets. Trapeze EAM creates a transit asset management database that includes, in accordance with the FTA's MAP-21 requirements, State of Good Repair reporting and analysis as well as capital project forecasting.

Portland Streetcar opened in 2001 and serves the Central City of Portland. Currently, it has a single line 3.9 miles long line that serves more than 3.7 million annual riders. The Central Loop, adding 3.3 miles and 28 stations, will be the system's second line.

Portland Streetcar is owned by the City Portland, managed by Portland Streetcar Incorporated, a non-profit corporation, and supported by TriMet operating personnel. Portland Streetcar was the first new streetcar system in the U.S. since World War II to use modern vehicles.

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