Security and Safety

Eliminating Risk for You and Your Shuttle Customers

Posted on September 2, 2015 by Louie Maiello

The 3 “S” rule of transportation — Safety/Service/Schedule — should not be limited to fixed-route bus service. Many modes of surface transportation can (and should) benefit from prioritizing the way in which we transport those that require our professional services. Whether we provide an airport shuttle service between terminals and/or rental car lots, or to and from a hotel, or perhaps as paratransit service, there are some common safety threads that apply universally to all operators.  

Let’s begin with five safety tips. I will assume that each one of us, regardless of the service we provide, conducts a thorough pre-trip of our vehicle to identify any safety issues before encountering your customers, with an emphasis on the proper functioning and operation of all boarding and alighting supplemental items.

1. Pre-Departure:
Seat and Mirror Positioning - The most important tool for any operator. If you are not sure of what each mirror should be reporting back to the operator, get educated on that subject. If you can’t see it, you can’t avoid it.

2. Departure:
Secured Customers - Where applicable, are those seated properly belted/secured? Are those standing prepared for bus movement? Is anyone unsecured and still boarding?

3. Departing:
Late Arriving Customers - Is it permissible to close doors? Are there any customers running for the vehicle? Is it permissible to begin to move the vehicle? If moving left in an attempt to join the traffic flow, is a sufficient amount of real estate available for smooth integration into moving traffic? Depending on who will receive service, some passengers may already possess physical issues and a smooth vehicle operation will surely benefit them — perhaps even more so than others.

4. In Service:
Are the 3 “S” rules of transportation being applied in a way that your customers can easily detect and understand that their well-being is the main concern of the carrier? Is vehicle speed being applied in a manner to suit the driving conditions? Is the right side of the vehicle being protected from moving traffic when applicable — also known as “covering your right?”

Covering the right is a sure way to reduce right-side incidents, which for the most part should be considered a “preventable” collision. It’s a no-brainer that if we are frequently required to service passengers to the right — and for the most part we all do — eliminating vehicle activity on the right side of our vehicles should be the norm. Are these “In Service” tips listed to this point being applied routinely from stop to stop?

5. Post-Trip and Self Critique:
Just as important as the pre-trip, a post-trip of the vehicle completes the daily journey of each vehicle in your fleet. Early detection of mechanical/safety issues minimizes the strain put on other vehicles and operators that may have to do more with less. The danger in taking a post-trip lightly is that Schedule can dangeously replace Safety as the first priority in the three “S” order. This never leads to a good end result.

In closing, an honest evaluation of your shuttle operation’s daily performance can cause you, at times, to be overly critical of yourself. An awareness of where some improvement may be needed is good and will go a long way in your daily operation and advancement within your organization. Give yourself credit for a job well done when the end result justifies your good performance. You are performing a most difficult job. 

Louie Maiello is a sr. consultant (transit training & simulation), L-3/DPA; independent consultant, Bus Talk Surface transit Solutions; and writes a monthly blog for metro-magazine.com.

View comments or post a comment on this story. (0 Comments)

More News

NY MTA bus drivers have reported nearly 1,000 threats this year

Drivers and union officials said an untold number of incidents never get reported. Last year, MTA bus drivers filed 1,466 reports of threats and harassment.

NTSB opens docket on 2015's Calif. Metrolink crash

The accident happened when a commuter train carrying 51 passengers and three crewmembers, collided with a 2005 Ford F450 utility service truck towing a two-axle utility trailer.

FTA releases rail vehicle securement report, issues WMATA safety directive

The investigation uncovered a lack of compliance with WMATA’s internal rules and procedures for unattended rail vehicle securement for both revenue passenger trains and maintenance machines and equipment located in rail yards.

FRA, AAR letter urges Pokemon creators to keep players off tracks

Letter stems from concern about reports that Pokémon characters, “Pokestops” and other virtual objects are being placed near railroad tracks, stations and rail-yard facilities

Man charged for hopping on subway tracks for Pokémon Go video

Toronto Transit Commission spokesman Brad Ross said Mark Correia, 20, has been charged with unauthorized access on subway tracks, which carries a set fine of $425.

See More News

Post a Comment

Post Comment

Comments (0)

More From The World's Largest Fleet Publisher

Automotive Fleet

The Car and truck fleet and leasing management magazine

Business Fleet

managing 10-50 company vehicles

Fleet Financials

Executive vehicle management

Government Fleet

managing public sector vehicles & equipment

TruckingInfo.com

THE COMMERCIAL TRUCK INDUSTRY’S MOST IN-DEPTH INFORMATION SOURCE

Work Truck Magazine

The number 1 resource for vocational truck fleets

Schoolbus Fleet

Serving school transportation professionals in the U.S. and Canada

LCT Magazine

Global Resource For Limousine and Bus Transportation

Please sign in or register to .    Close