The NTSB's preliminary report offered no new information as to why the train was traveling nearly 50 mph faster than the speed limit when it crashed and reiterated that had Positive Train Control been implemented on the train that the crash would have been prevented.
Washington State Patrol

The NTSB's preliminary report offered no new information as to why the train was traveling nearly 50 mph faster than the speed limit when it crashed and reiterated that had Positive Train Control been implemented on the train that the crash would have been prevented.

Washington State Patrol

WASHINGTON, D.C. — More than two weeks after an Amtrak train derailed in Dupont, Wash., killing three people and injuring dozens, National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigators have not been able to interview the engineer who was driving the train, The Seattle Times reports.

NTSB officials have been unable to interview the engineer, or the other crew member who was in the lead locomotive, because of their injuries sustained in the crash, according to a preliminary report that was released. The engineer, whose name was withheld, is 55 years old and has been working for Amtrak since May 2004, serving as an engineer since August 2013.

The report offered no new information as to why the train was traveling nearly 50 mph faster than the speed limit when it crashed and reiterated that had Positive Train Control been implemented on the train that the crash would have been prevented. Officials added that it is not unusual that they have not been able to speak with the engineer, given the extent of his injuries. For the full story, click here.

0 Comments