PRT engineers and an engineering consultant determined that at least one pair of resistors that prevent the brakes of the incline from engaging in the middle of each trip was underrated for that function, causing the resistors to fail, and leading to the incline’s subsequent closure.  -  Photo: PRT

PRT engineers and an engineering consultant determined that at least one pair of resistors that prevent the brakes of the incline from engaging in the middle of each trip was underrated for that function, causing the resistors to fail, and leading to the incline’s subsequent closure.

Photo: PRT

A Philadelphia consultant will conduct an independent review of the Monongahela Incline to improve the reliability, maintenance, and operations of the 154-year-old funicular, the Pittsburgh Regional Transit (PRT) announced.

Talson Solutions will review recent incline contracts, as well as current procedures and protocols. They will start their work this month. Their costs are being finalized.

Talson Bringing Experience to Review

According to its website, Talson “assist(s) clients in mitigating capital program risk by improving financial and project controls, increasing contractor and owner transparency, and enhancing project delivery.”

Talson will complete its work in phases and will provide regular reports to a review committee made up of community members, business owners, and other key stakeholders.

Over the next several months, Talson will make recommendations for future contracts and help to identify short- and long-term improvements to the operations and maintenance of the incline, which has been closed since March 5.

PRT’s Incline Issues

PRT engineers and an engineering consultant determined that at least one pair of resistors that prevent the brakes of the incline from engaging in the middle of each trip was underrated for that function, causing the resistors to fail, and leading to the incline’s subsequent closure.

PRT is currently reviewing an updated electrical design that incorporates new resistors. Once accepted, the contractor will purchase, install, and test the incline before PRT can submit an amended permit application to the Pennsylvania Department of Licenses and Inspections and submit for an inspection.

PRT hopes to be able to provide an updated timeline next week.

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