Norman Y. Mineta created the Transportation Security Administration after the 9/11 attacks, and displayed passion in finding ways to move people through better transportation. - Photo: MTI

Norman Y. Mineta created the Transportation Security Administration after the 9/11 attacks, and displayed passion in finding ways to move people through better transportation.

Photo: MTI

The Mineta Transportation Institute announced the passing today of its namesake, Norman Y. Mineta. He was 90.

Secretary Mineta was a Japanese-American born and raised in San Jose. He rose through the political ranks starting in the 1960s, and became the city’s mayor in 1971, before serving in Congress for 10 terms. 

Mineta was the only Democrat serving in President George W. Bush's cabinet, as Secretary of Transportation. He created the Transportation Security Administration after the 9/11 attacks, and displayed passion in finding ways to move people through better transportation.

Mineta also succeeded in moving those around him through his passion, persona, and strength of will to make lives better.

The American Public Transportation Association (APTA) released a statement following the news.

“The American Public Transportation Association (APTA) joins the entire public transportation industry in mourning the passing of former U.S. Department of Transportation Secretary Norman Y. Mineta. The first Asian American to serve as head of the DOT, former Chairman of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure of the U.S. House of Representatives, and founder of the Mineta Transportation Institute, Secretary Mineta was an indefatigable champion for investment in, and access to, public transportation. APTA was proud to award Secretary Mineta a Lifetime Achievement Award in 2006, reflective of a life dedicated to championing the vast benefits public transportation brings to communities across the country. I had the honor to serve on the Board of Trustees of the Mineta Transportation Institute and know firsthand the impact Secretary Mineta had on not just our industry, but this nation. He will be greatly missed.”

MTI said it is proud to continue his legacy of improving the nation’s transportation systems and educating the transportation workforce of the future.

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