Construction for the first phase of the E line began in 2006 and spanned 8.6 miles between 7th Street/Metro Center Station and La Cienega/Jefferson - Photo: L.A. Metro

Construction for the first phase of the E line began in 2006 and spanned 8.6 miles between 7th Street/Metro Center Station and La Cienega/Jefferson

Photo: L.A. Metro

The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) celebrated the 10-year anniversary of the first phase of the E Line (Expo) from downtown Los Angeles to La Cienega/Jefferson in the West Adams neighborhood near Culver City.

The Expo officially opened on April 27, 2012.

In the 10 years since the first phase opened to the public, the line has carried nearly 127 million boardings.

"The E line is today one of the most vital transit lines that we operate in Los Angeles County," said Hilda L. Solis, Metro board chair. "This line serves as a key link for riders who need to make countywide connections including the Eastside, Long Beach, Redondo Beach, the San Gabriel Valley, and the San Fernando Valley. Later this year, after the Regional Connector opens, riders will be able to travel from East LA to Santa Monica on the E Line with a one-seat ride — demonstrating what true mobility is for Angelenos."

Construction for the first phase of the E line began in 2006 and spanned 8.6 miles between 7th Street/Metro Center Station and La Cienega/Jefferson, with the Farmdale and Culver City stations opening in June 2012. The remainder of the line extended another 6.6 miles to reach Santa Monica in 2016.

"As we celebrate the 10-year anniversary of the E Line, we are reminded that good things come to those who wait. The E line now serves as the backbone of transit connection throughout Central Los Angeles and communities in my district like Expo Park, USC, West Adams, Baldwin Hills, Culver City," said Holly Mitchell, Metro board member. "We eagerly await the arrival of the Crenshaw/LAX line, which will connect to the E line and transform mobility in our region, particularly for some of the most underserved communities of the County." 

Phase one of the Metro Expo Line costed $932 million at the time. There were 12 stations with two stations shared with the Metro Blue Line which provided service to USC, Exposition Park, the Mid-City communities, the Crenshaw District, and Culver City.

"Commuters waited for many years to have a convenient transit alternative to being stuck in traffic congestion coming in and out of the Westside," said Sheila Kuehl, Metro board member. "The E line has proven to be a welcome lifeline to major L.A. destinations, including USC, job centers, beaches, the Pier, museums, religious centers, medical institutions, commerce and recreational facilities."

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