The Strategic Action Plan, first announced in May, will outline how pedestrians, cyclists, and micromobility users can better access MTA facilities.  -  Photo: Canva

The Strategic Action Plan, first announced in May, will outline how pedestrians, cyclists, and micromobility users can better access MTA facilities.

Photo: Canva

Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) officials announced a series of initial actions being undertaken through its landmark Bike, Pedestrian, and Micromobility Strategic Action Plan.

The actions include capital projects enhancing bike and pedestrian access to MTA bridges, additional bike parking infrastructure at subway stations throughout the system, and the initial commuter rail stations to pilot improved car-free connectivity to local communities, according to MTA's news release.

The Strategic Action Plan, first announced in May, will outline how pedestrians, cyclists, and micromobility users can better access MTA facilities and services in collaboration with local governments, advocacy groups, and stakeholders. 

“Increasing access and connections to MTA services is one of my top goals,” said Janno Lieber, MTA chair/CEO. “Today’s announcement represents the first steps in a comprehensive strategy to provide more car-free access to transit across the New York region. As MTA ridership continues to rise, the actions we unveiled today will upgrade connections to transit for cyclists, pedestrians, and micromobility users and bring more riders back to the MTA’s subways, buses, and commuter railroads.” 

The MTA board approved the award of a capital project recommended by the Strategic Action Plan to improve cycling and ADA access on the Cross Bay Bridge. 

In addition, on the Henry Hudson Bridge, the MTA said it will widen the existing lower-level walkway so that it is suitable for shared use and will construct ADA-compliant ramps on both the north and south approaches to this shared use path.

In collaboration with the New York City Department of Transportation (NYC DOT), bike parking infrastructure will be installed at 37 subway stations that currently lack bike racks within 100 feet of station entrances.

“Investing in greater pedestrian, bike, and micromobility access at MTA bridges and stations will make it easier to get around our region,” said Danny Harris, executive director of Transportation Alternatives. “With increased bridge access, more bike parking, and better multimodal trip planning, we can build on New York City’s bike boom and reduce reliance on cars. We look forward to the release of MTA’s full Micromobility Strategic Access Plan.” 

As the MTA announced in May, the final Bike, Pedestrian, and Micromobility Strategic Action Plan will be released by the end of 2022.

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