Noonlight dispatchers provide assistance from the moment an alert is triggered until police officers arrive.
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Noonlight dispatchers provide assistance from the moment an alert is triggered until police officers arrive.

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St. Louis’ Metro Transit extended its partnership with Noonlight, and current users can continue to use the safety app for free, while new users are able to sign up for a free version.

Noonlight is a connected safety platform and mobile app for iOS and Android devices designed to help transit riders feel more comfortable when they are on Metro Transit or anywhere else in the St. Louis region by allowing them to get help with just a touch of a button. The app works anywhere in the bi-state region as well as throughout the U.S.

With Noonlight, any Metro passenger who feels uncomfortable or at risk can open the Noonlight app on their mobile device and hold their thumb on the safe button. Once any danger passes, they can release the button and enter their personal four-digit pin number. If help is needed, they can release the button without entering the pin, and Noonlight gives local police the user’s name, emergency information, and current location. Noonlight dispatchers provide assistance from the moment an alert is triggered until police officers arrive. If users cannot or do not want to talk to the dispatchers, they can text or remain silent, and emergency help will be dispatched.

The latest version of Noonlight includes an automatic crash detection and response program. The app is now able to detect changes in the user’s location, motion, and force, and if the app detects a sudden change, it will alert 911. The app has the capability to detect crashes on a bus or train, car, or other vehicle; on a bicycle; or even on an electric scooter. The app also can connect to Google Home, Alexa, Nest, and various other smart devices, which upon sensing danger, will trigger Noonlight to call for help on a person’s behalf. As an example, Noonlight can notify authorities if there is heavy smoke or carbon monoxide present when connected with Nest. The app can also connect with Facebook, Wyze Cam, and other programs with If This, Then That — also known as IFTTT.

“Over the last year, we have had more than 8,400 transit riders take advantage of this valuable safety tool, and we are excited to continue to offer it at no charge for all of our riders,” said Taulby Roach, president/CEO of Bi-State Development.

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